Fall Planting in Florida

According to the weather man, we have had our first “cold-front”. For those of us here in Central Florida that means we didn’t break 90 Degrees Fahrenheit. If you are anything like me you put a light jacket on in the morning and by 9am you were sweating bullets!

Much like the temperature is different, fall planting is also on a bit of a different schedule in Zone 9. (what are zones in the gardening word?) During the summer, the scorching heat and heavy rain makes it difficult to produce the variety of vegetables we would like. While things like peppers, okra and eggplant grow well in the hot, muggy, rainy Florida summers, it can be difficult to successfully grow much else. And while I LOVE my successful peppers this year, I am ready for more variety!

IMG_20150829_100450

This week is the official start of fall and that means it is the BEST growing season in Florida! So I have begun to start my seeds. This fall I will be planing zucchini, yellow squash, a variety of different tomatoes, mustard greens, collard greens, swiss chard, beats, carrots, radishes and a variety of herbs, just to name a few! I am so EXCITED!

Collage 2015-09-21 17_36_29 I like using these mini greenhouses to help with the germination process. Starting your seeds is very important. Make sure you read the package to see if you should start them indoors or if you can sow them straight into the ground.

I’ll have an update soon when I am ready to transplant into the ground! Be sure to leave a comment and tell me what you are growing this fall!

Happy Fall planting!

Much Love

Eva

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

5 thoughts on “Fall Planting in Florida

    • Thank you Jennylina! In most parts of the country it gets a little too cool for cucumbers in the Fall. However if you are in Florida it is still really warm so it is a great time to start growing them. But if you want to plant them for the Fall I would get them started as soon as possible. Cucumbers take anywhere from 50-70 days to mature from seed to harvest and do not do well once the temps get too low. They grow best when temps are between 70-80 degrees.

  1. Love this website! I too have always had a brown thumb, but slowly I am turning that around. I can’t wait to read more posts, you have good advice. Thanks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *