Tomato Update

A few weeks ago I wrote about how I ripen tomatoes indoors once the forecast calls for the first frost. It is a highly technical process (sarcasm) so if you missed it you can find that blog entry here -> http://greenthumbjourney.com/?p=309.

I wanted to give y’all an update so you can see how my tomatoes are coming along! Screenshot_2016-02-23-09-49-47-1
We have already used several of them but the ones that remain are looking good! As you can see, the not-so-highly technical process I used to ripen the tomatoes indoors is working just fine. I have not had to buy tomatoes for a while and my heart will slowly break when I do. For now I will be enjoying the last of my tomatoes from last season that grew beautifully all because I decided to plant a seed. It truly is one of the best feelings in the world. :)
Like most home gardeners say this time of year….I can’t wait until spring!

Until next time!

Eva

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Collard Greens: Plant once and get greens all season!

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Looking for an easy starter plant to test out your green thumb? How about a plant that keeps on giving for months? Collard greens are not only easy to grow, if the leaves are cut correctly, you will continue to harvest greens from the same plant for months.

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Collards are traditionally a cold-hardy plant but there are some varieties, such as the Georgia Collard, that do well for most of the year even in warmer climates. While they can be grown almost any time of the year, it is said that the colder temperatures give the collards a sweeter flavor.
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Plant the seeds about a 1/2 inch deep and about 3 inches apart. As plants grow, thin out to about 12 inches in order to give the collards plenty of room to grow their beautiful wide leaves. When collards are ready to harvest, you do not have to cut the whole plant down to harvest the leaves. Once the leaves are at least 10 inches long you can harvest individual leaves. Start at the bottom of the plant and work your way up until you have harvested the desired amount. The collard plant will continue to grow leaves long after you have started harvesting and will look like a mini tree by the end of the season.

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Here in central Florida, our Georgia Collards grow best during late fall and all through winter. They will continue growing through the spring but tend to struggle a bit during the hottest months of the summer (June-September).

I would love to hear some of your recipes with Collard Greens! Please comment below with one of your favorites!

Until next time!

Eva

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